Sunday, December 7, 2014

THEN AND NOW #25: TONY TAYLOR 1976

Today we celebrate the solid career of second baseman Tony Taylor with a "Super Veteran" card I designed as part of the 1976 set.
Take a look:


Taylor was closing out a nice 19-year career in 1976 after  returning for three seasons with the team he starred for between 1960 and 1971, the Philadelphia Phillies.
The Cuban garnered over 2000 hits, 1000 runs scored, and 230 stolen bases to go along with his .261 career batting average.
His best season in the big leagues would arguably be 1963, when he hit .281 with 102 runs scored, 180 hits, 20 doubles, 10 triples and five homers while getting some "M.V.P. attention" for the only time in his career (16th place) in National League voting.
Here's to you Tony...

3 comments:

  1. Looks good! However, I think that your "Then & Now" cards look their best from 1973-77. I also think that the "Then" cards should be limited to the 1950s. Cards from 1960 (McCovey), 1961 (Marichal and Santo), 1962 (Brock), 1964 (Allen), and 1965 (Hunter) are too recent. Topps didn't have a crystal ball which told them when these players were on the verge of retiring. Otherwise, why not make "Then & Now" cards of any player who had a rookie card in the 1960s. Any thoughts?

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    Replies
    1. Hey Joe! Totally agree! I originally was doing the "Then and Now" cards of Hall of Famers only. So I just went on designing for all of them who had a "last card" (except for McCovey-1980) during the 1970's.
      Once the Hall members were done I just kept going with anyone that struck my fancy. Ha!
      But yeah, would have been easier to go with players who had rookie cards in the 1950's.
      Gotta say though, I like the way the 1971 versions came out! May be my favorites...

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  2. The 1971 Topps "Then & Now" card of Ernie Banks definitely looks good, but I don't like the 1972 "Then & Now" cards (Wilhelm and Mazeroski) at all. With that said, I think that the cards you made from 1973 to 1977 look best. Besides, I highly doubt that Topps would've done a mini-series during the 1970s extending for nine back-to-back years.

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