Tuesday, December 6, 2016

MISSING IN ACTION 1974 LARRY HOWARD

Here’s a “missing” 1974 card for a player I already created a 1973 card for, former catcher Larry Howard:


I created the 1973 card a while back, showing him as a Houston Astros player, and today we have him as an Atlanta Brave, as he split the 1973 season with both teams.
Turns out that 1973 season would be his last in the big leagues, appearing in 24 games, with only four in Atlanta, on his way to a .161 batting average with nine hits in 56 at-bats.
That would close out a short four year career that had him play 133 games, hitting .236 with 86 lifetime hits in 365 official at-bats.

Monday, December 5, 2016

FANTASY COACH CARD- 1978 FRANK ROBINSON

Here’s a fantasy coach card for Hall of Fame slugger Frank Robinson, who was back in Baltimore after a managerial stint in Cleveland, making him the first African-American Major League skipper:


After his prolific playing career that saw him wallop 586 homers, garner two MVP Awards (one in each league), and win two championships while with the Orioles, Robinson put together a long and respected post-playing career that STILL has him working for the Commissioner as Senior Advisor.
In between, he not only led the Indians, but also went on to managerial jobs with the Baltimore Orioles, San Francisco Giants and Montreal Expos/Washington Nationals.
One of THE respected voices in baseball, Robinson has managed to equal his spot in baseball history off the playing field as well as on it.

Sunday, December 4, 2016

1976 PROJECT- A DEDICATED CRAIG REYNOLDS CARD

Here’s a 1976 card for a player who appeared on a multi-player rookie card in the set: Craig Reynolds of the Pittsburgh Pirates:


“Reader Jim” wanted a dedicated card for Reynolds based on the amount of action he had with the Pirates in 1975.
Reynolds came up in ’75 and appeared in 31 games, batting .224 with 17 hits over 76 official at-bats while playing shortstop.
After only four games in 1976 he would get his chance for full-time action as a member of the inaugural Seattle Mariners team of 1977, playing in 135 games as their very first shortstop (there’s a great trivia question!).
He would actually represent the team the following year at the All-Star Game, yet find himself playing for the Houston Astros the very next season, where he would end up playing the rest of his 15-year career.
A solid player generally off the bench, he would end up with a .256 batting average with 1142 hits in 4466 at-bats over 1491 games while playing through the entire infield.

Saturday, December 3, 2016

TURN BACK THE CLOCK- BERT CAMPANERIS HITS 2 HOMERS IN MLB DEBUT

Here’s a card celebrating the awesome Major League debut of former Kansas City/Oakland A’s star Bert Campaneris, who hit two home runs off of Minnesota Twins pitcher Jim Kaat on July 23rd, 1964:


Campy became just the second player in history at the time to accomplish the feat, joining Bob Nieman who accomplished the feat in 1951, and joined since then by three others.
Considering the guy would stick around for 19 years and play another 2327 games before he was through, the fact that he’d only hit another 76 homers makes his debut that much more special.
Of course slugging notwithstanding, Campaneris would go on the become an all-star shortstop in the 1970’s as part of the three-time World Champion Oakland A’s teams that also featured guys like Reggie Jackson, Gene Tenace and Joe Rudi.
I’ve always dug the odd season of 1970 when he slugged 22 homers, the only season in his career that he even hit double-digits, let alone 20+! With his second highest total would be the eight homers he hit in 1972.
By the time he retired after the 1983 season after 60 games with the New York Yankees, he finished with over 2000 hits, 1000 runs scored and 649 stolen bases, leading the American League six times with a high of 62 in 1968 and 1969, and was named to six all-star teams.

Friday, December 2, 2016

MISSING IN ACTION- "IN ACTION"- 1972 JIM PERRY

Here’s the next “MIA-MIA” card, one of 215 games winner and 1970 Cy Young Award recipient Jim Perry, who was in the middle of his most productive run of his 17-year career:


Perry was coming off a 17-win season in 1971, which followed his 24-win award-winning campaign of the year before while pitching for the Minnesota Twins.
He would go on to win 13, 14 and 17 wins each of the next three years, the last of which was back with the team he came up with in 1959, the Cleveland Indians.
He’d wrap up his Major League action with 15 games with the Oakland A’s (of which I am DESPERATELY looking for color photos of), going 3-4 with a 4.66 earned run average, leaving him with a 215-174 record along with a 3.45 ERA and 1576 strikeouts over 3285.2 innings and 630 appearances, 447 of which were starts.
Along with his Hall of Fame brother Gaylord, the pair would go on to win over 525 Major League games between them! Amazing...

Thursday, December 1, 2016

MISSING IN ACTION- 1978 HECTOR TORRES

Here’s a card for a guy who had a few “missing” cards throughout the decade, former infielder Hector Torres, today’s card being a 1978 “capper” of sorts:


Torres finished up a nine-year career spanning 1968-1977 with 91 games for the Toronto Blue Jays, hitting .241 with 64 hits over 266 at-bats. Decent playing time for a guy left out of the 1978 set.
He should have also been included in the 1973 and 1977 sets considering his playing time the previous seasons, just about 200 plate appearances both times.
He’d end up with a .216 average over his career, with 375 hits in 1738 official at-bats in 622 games playing for five teams: Houston Astros, Chicago Cubs, Montreal Expos, San Diego padres and Blue Jays.

Wednesday, November 30, 2016

A LITTLE GLIMPSE OF THINGS TO COME...

Here's a nice shot of the first four "wthballs" custom postcards trimmed to size, given FREE with each of the next four issues of "wthballs" magazine.




The 1974 Willie Mays postcard is available now buy purchasing a copy of the "1974 Missing in Action" magazine (#6), with the other postcards available with each subsequent issue. These art-cards are issued as 4" x 6" postcards that can be cut to size if you like. Or keep them at full-size if you prefer!

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Everything baseball: cards, events, history and more.