Monday, October 31, 2016

MISSING IN ACTION- 1976 GENE HISER

Here’s a “missing” 1976 card for former Chicago Cub outfielder Gene Hiser, who played all five of his Major League seasons on the North Side of Chi-Town:


Hiser appeared in 45 games for the Cubbies in 1975, batting .242 with 15 hits in 62 at-bats, with eleven runs scored and six runs batted in with three doubles.
It would be the last Major League action he’d see after coming up with the organization in 1971 at the age of 22.
The most he played in any season was in 1973 when he got in 100 games, batting .174 with 19 hits over 109 at-bats, as he was generally used off the bench.
His career numbers added up to a .202 average with 53 hits in 263 at-bats over 206 games, with 34 runs scored and 18 RBI’s while playing all his defense in the outfield.
I personally always remember him as the guy pictured in the middle of the Burt Hooten 1972 Chicago Cubs rookie card, probably the first rookie card from that set I ever got years after it’s release.

2 comments:

  1. My specific memory of Gene Hiser is an article from Baseball Digest, (summer) 1975, analyzing the Cubs-Rangers trade which sent Fergie Jenkins to the Rangers for Bill Madlock and Vic Harris; the Cubs had previously acquired Mike Paul and Rico Carty from the Rangers as "stretch drive" acquisitions late in the 1973 season, and they may have been considered the first installment for Jenkins. According to this article, the original trade talks also included Randy Hundley and Gene Hiser from the Cubs, in return for the addition of Jim Sundberg and Tom Grieve. At some point, so the story goes, Billy Martin got a look at Jim Sundberg (? perhaps as a September call up, or in the instructional league?) and vetoed his inclusion, collapsing the trade to it's eventual parameters. Of note is that the Cubs had originally sought Dave Nelson as the second baseman (to succeed Glenn Beckert), but were rebuffed by Billy Martin, and compromised instead on Vic Harris.

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  2. AndyM... Outstanding post! That certainly would have changed the look of some baseball cards...

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