Saturday, December 5, 2015

TURN BACK THE CLOCK 1952: WALT DROPO COLLECTS HIT IN 12 CONSECUTIVE AT-BATS

Here’s a “Turn Back The Clock” card celebrating Walt Dropo’s 12 consecutive hits in 12 at-bats back in 1952 as a member of the Detroit Tigers:


After getting traded to the Tigers from the Boston Red Sox, Dropo went on to have a streak for the ages beginning on July 14th against the New York Yankees when he went 5-for-5.
The next day, during the first game of a double-header against the Washington Senators he proceeded to go 4-for-4, giving him nine straight hits going into the nightcap.
Wouldn’t you know it, he’d then go on to get a hit in his first three at-bats, matching the Major League record set by Pinky Higgins of the Boston Red Sox back in 1938.
After popping out in his fourth at-bat of the game he’d collect yet another hit, giving him 16 knocks in three games, matching the American League record.
I remember thinking of Dropo back in 2012 when Mike Trout was having his amazing rookie season.
I always felt that Trout, while an incredible talent, was a bit over-hyped with his rookie season numbers, especially when people kept saying it was the greatest rookie season of all-time.
Right off the bat I kept thinking of a few that I felt were better, including Dropo’s unreal rookie year that saw him hit .322 with 34 homers, 144 runs batted in and 101 runs scored, with a .583 slugging percentage and 326 total bases.
Now I’m not saying it’s THE best rookie year, but it IS a season I felt was on par, if not better than Trout’s.
Anyone have another rookie season they feel was “the best”?
I think of two that “technically” weren’t rookie years, but should be: Joe Jackson’s 1911 season and Alex Rodriguez’ 1996 season.
Why ISN’T Jackson’s 1911 season considered a rookie season anyway?

3 comments:

  1. I think 1911 is considered Jackson's rookie year--Baseball reference lists it as such, and I see several sites that refer to him setting rookie records during that year.

    For comparison's sake, Jackson during that year had an amazing 193 OPS+ and a bWAR of 9.2. In Trout's rookier year, his OPS+ was 168 and his bWAR a robust 10.8 (obviously Trout is considered a much better defensive player than JJ, although of course it's questionable how accurate such numbers could be for Jackson's era). By comparision, Dropo's numbers were 134 and 2.6, so the advanced metrics don't put his rookie year in the same category, for what it's worth.

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  2. I think ’ 1996 is considered Alex Rodriguez rookie year. This is golden time for Alex Rodriguez. This information is really rare.

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  3. I think ’ 1996 is considered Alex Rodriguez rookie year. This is golden time for Alex Rodriguez. This information is really rare.

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