Thursday, September 10, 2015

JUST FOR THE FUN OF IT- 1970'S BASEBALL TRIVIA PART #113 (A REVISIT OF #31)




It's Thursday Trivia Day.
So let's revisit my trivia set from New Years, 2014.
This week's questions dealt with wins-leaders of the 1970's. Take a shot and see how many you get.
As usual answers will appear tomorrow…

1. Among all wins leaders of the '70's, what pitcher suffered the most losses during his "winning" campaign?

2. Of all the wins leaders during the 1970's, who recorded the most strikeouts during their winning season?

3. On the flip side, what wins leader was the only one to strikeout less than 100 batters during his winning season?

4. What wins leader had the highest batting-average-against during his league leading wins season?

5. Who pitched the least amount of innings during his wins-leading season during the 1970's?


***SPOILER ALERT! ANSWERS BELOW: 

1. It's a tie: Wilbur Wood, White Sox, 1973 and Phil Niekro, Braves, 1979. Both had 20 losses.

2. Steve Carlton, Phillies. 310 K's in 1972.
 
3. Randy Jones, Padres. He whiffed only 93 batters in 1976.
 
4. Wilbur Wood, White Sox. Batters hit .270 against him in 1973.

5. Gaylord Perry, Padres. He pitched in "only" 260.2 innings in 1978.

3 comments:

  1. It's amazing to me how guys could pitch 250-300 innings and have 10-15 complete games per year back then. Players today are on pitch counts and guys are lucky to make it through five innings per start even with all of the improved training methods and sports science. They even have the "quality start" stat which is BS in my book.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I've read many times that they think the reason for all the arm breakdowns now is because these kids pitch year round, never giving their arms any rest over the winter. Don't know how true this is, but it is incredible with all the "modern" training, etc, we see these arms get wrecked so much quicker now.
      As for these "new-fangled" stats: my friend it ALL seems like B.S. to me. Consider me somewhat old school.
      My un-favorite is this new "statcast" with all the exit-velocity of a home run i.e. the speed of the ball off the bat. Seriously? we're doing THIS now?
      Ugh...
      ;)

      Delete
  2. It could be. I also think the change-up has become the off-speed pitch of choice since the 80's and that probably has something to do with it. Do people even throw the curveball any more?

    I'm not familiar with that exit-velocity measurement and I'm not sure what that would be good for. Sports on TV is becoming a reality video game.

    ReplyDelete

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