Thursday, September 8, 2016

MISSING IN ACTION- 1971 DANNY MURPHY

Here’s a “missing” 1971 card for a guy who came up as a teenage outfielder in 1960 with the Chicago Cubs, but retooled and ended his career as a Chicago White Sox pitcher 10 years later, Danny Murphy:


Murphy was in the Major Leagues as a 17-year old during the 1960 season and saw limited play over the next three years before going back to the Minors and becoming a pitcher, eventually making it back to the big leagues in 1969 with the cross-town Pale Hose.
In 1970 Murphy appeared in 51 games, posting a 2-3 record with a 5.69 earned run average over 80.2 innings.
The previous season he made the long journey back after toiling for six years in the Minors, and posted a 2-1 record with a nice 2.01 ERA over 17 games and 31.1 innings.
In between he played for both Chicago and Houston organizations, making the switch in 1965 once he joined the White Sox, though the ‘69 & ‘70 seasons were the only action his pitching would bring him.
After playing for the Boston Red Sox organization in 1971 he was out of baseball for good.

4 comments:

  1. Sounded like an interesting story to a searched if he had any real cards. Funny how his '61 and '62 cards are identical down to the rookie star in the corner.
    Nice to see he also had at least one real card as a pitcher, 1970. Can you think of many other guys who got Topps cards as both a pitcher and hitter? That's gotta be pretty rare. Somebody should do a post on that subject!

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  2. Mel Queen (Reds) actually had a Topps card in the 60s where he was shown as a pitcher AND outfielder on the card!

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    Replies
    1. Correct. Mel Queen's 1967 card listed his position as P-OF. It certainly caught my eye as a youngster and stayed in my memory to this day.

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  3. Skip Lockwood 65 rookie card with A's shows him as an infielder. His other cards throughput 70's as a pitcher

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