Wednesday, August 27, 2014

MISSING IN ACTION-"IN ACTION" #3: 1972 BOB GIBSON

Let's give "Gibby" an "in action" card in the 1972 Topps set!
Check out my card:


So once again…guys like Jerry Johnson, John Ellis and Tom Haller get "in-action" cards in the set, but THIS GUY doesn't?
Does anyone out there even know what Topps criteria for those in-action cards were?! For the life of me I can't figure it out.
I managed to find a nice night-game shot of Gibson to use for the card.
You know, if I find myself feeling up to it, I swear I'm tempted to make an "in-action" 1972 card for every single player in the set!
We shall see…let's start with the stars first…

9 comments:

  1. Wow, that is stunning. The border colors compliment the picture perfectly. And yet again, what was Topps thinking? I think I was nine at the time and could have done a better job of picking out the stars of the day.

    Regardless, you nailed it on this one Gio.

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  2. That would have been the coolest card of his career. Only the 1969 WS card from his 17 strikeout game is close.

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  3. In the 1972 set, Topps only gave In Action cards to players whose regular cards were between numbers 31-54, 163-186, 291-314, 426-448, 551-574, and 691-714. Some effort was made so that Mays, Aaron, Clemente, Bench, Seaver, Rose, and Carew would get these cards, yet other players like Gibson, Palmer, Carlton, McCovey, Brooks Robinson, Ryan (possibly), and Kaline were unfortunately skipped. Perhaps assigning one block of In Action cards to players per series - regardless of whether a star or not - was more convenient to the designer in some way.

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  4. Excellent Gibby!

    No idea how they went about choosing who would get an IN ACTION card.

    To what Joe says above I can add that the IN ACTION cards followed the players regular issue card in number order, yet on uncut sheets of 1972 Topps all IN ACTION cards were grouped together down in the corner. Maybe it was a printing issue. Great question for a great set.

    http://jun08.hugginsandscott.com/pl/101026_1972_topps_uncut.jpg

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  5. Like I said above, it's possible that Topps could've made an IN ACTION card of Nolan Ryan in the 1972 set. However, I'm convinced that he would've been depicted as a member of the New York Mets and not the California Angels -- unless Topps chose to airbrush an Angels uniform onto a photo of him from the 1971 season, which is very unlikely. Not only that, but Ryan would also then have to be depicted as a Met and not an Angel on his regular card as well. What do you think?

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    Replies
    1. Funny you should ask, as I have already designed an "in action" card for him, and in an Angels uniform.
      I do mention on the post (i'm about a month ahead, so it'll be a while before it's posted), that it was an "iffy" situation with Ryan and any card inn the 1972 set. I just figured Topps was indeed aware of him being an Angels player by the time the set came out, so I stuck with the Angels.
      But I DO enjoy designing Nolan Ryan NY Mets cards!!! So I'll try finding any reason in the future to do so...

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  6. There was not ONE Cardinal player on an "in action" card in that '72 Topps set, and as a Cardinal fan, it always irked me. It's not as if there weren't any Cardinals who good enough to gain the distinction. Gibson (as you note,) Ted Simmons and Lou Brock were at their peak in that era.

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  7. There was not ONE Cardinal player on an "in action" card in that '72 Topps set, and as a Cardinal fan, it always irked me. It's not as if there weren't any Cardinals who good enough to gain the distinction. Gibson (as you note,) Ted Simmons and Lou Brock were at their peak in that era.

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