Sunday, April 9, 2017

AIRBRUSHING ALL FOR NOTHING- 1977 DAVE DUNCAN INTO A WHITE SOX UNIFORM

Just wanted to take the time out to spotlight the 1977 Dave Duncan Topps card today for a couple of reasons, first off being the airbrushing job:


As with a bunch of the other Chicago White Sox in the 1977 set, Duncan was airbrushed into the organization’s new uniforms, giving us airbrush classics like this one.
Definitely not the worst of the bunch, but it turns out it was all for nothing since Duncan, who was traded by the Baltimore Orioles in November of 1976 for Pat Kelly, ended up being released right before the 1977 season began, on March 30th.
He’d never catch on as a player again in the Majors, but as we all know he would go on to an incredibly successful coaching career, beginning with the Cleveland Indians in 1979 and running straight through to 2011 with the St. Louis Cardinals.
Between 1983 and 2011 he continuously worked as a coach for manager Tony LaRussa, including the Oakland “Bash Brothers” run and later on the Albert Pujols-era Cardinals, leading to three championships (1989, 2006 and 2011).
On a side note: though he showed some “pop” as a player, hitting as many as 19 home runs in 1972 with Oakland, his 1966 minor league season was eye-popping on the back of a baseball card!
With the Modesto Reds of the California League, he hit an incredible 46 home runs, along with 112 runs batted in and 103 runs scored in only 439 at-bats!
His NEXT highest home run total in the minors was 15, which was the previous year!
I don’t know what was going on that season in Modesto, but something HAD to be different. No? Makes no sense.
Anyone have a clue? Would love to hear it...

4 comments:

  1. Those particular SOX uniforms led to some really terrible airbrushing jobs by TOPPS.

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  2. Remember Dave Duncan from the late 60's as well. Not sure what happened in Modesto, but I know what you are saying about those guys that have that one power year. Take Davey Johnson for instance. Plays for Baltimore a few years with a high of 18 home runs. Gets traded to Atlanta in 1973 and he suddenly hits 43 home runs. Maybe it's the stadium? But that theory doesn't hold up. He only hits 15 the next year in the same stadium and never gets close to the 43 again. Go figure. Thanks for the post.

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  3. I remember being really weirded out by this airbrushed photo when I pulled the card as an 8-year old.

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  4. 1977 had a bunch of odd airbrushing.. I've seen some of the White Sox cards.. I have the Jays cards.. I haven't seen many of the Mariners, so I don't know how bad they look. I actually wrote a post about the differences between the 1977 OPC and Topps on my blog.

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