Tuesday, March 17, 2015

MISSING IN ACTION- 1976 CECIL UPSHAW: "1976 PROJECT"

Next up on the "1976 Project" that blog reader Jim and I have been mapping out is former relief pitcher Cecil Upshaw.
Check out the way my card for him came out:


Upshaw was finishing up a nine-year career at the end of the 1975 season, appearing in 29 games and 47.1 innings of work for the Chicago White Sox.
He posted a 1-1 record with a 3.23 E.R.A., one save and 22 strikeouts over those appearances, and it certainly demands a card in my book!
His finest Major League campaign was easily the 1969 season with the National League West Champion Atlanta Braves, when he went 6-4 with a 2.91 earned run average, with 27 saves and 57 strikeouts over 62 games and 105.1 innings.
His 1968 season wasn't too shabby as well! That year he went 8-7 with a very nice 2.47 E.R.A., 13 saves and 74 strikeouts over 52 games and 116.2 innings, also all in relief.
Arm troubles slowed his career down a bit, and he even missed all of 1970.
But once back in 1971 he'd go on to pitch for the Braves, Astros, Indians, Yankees and White Sox.
He would finish with a 34-36 lifetime record with 86 saves, a 3.13 E.R.A., and 323 strikeouts in 348 games, all of them out of the 'pen.

10 comments:

  1. Hey look... It's card number 662 of the 1976 Topps Baseball set! Just like the Jake Brown card, this fits right in.

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  2. Nice card. Love the scoreboard in the back.

    It's weird reading these posts everyday and getting my memory jogged by names like Cecil Upshaw, Nellie Briles and Horace Clarke. It's amazing to see how much the players and the game have changed since the 70's.

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    1. When I collected baseball cards it seemed like I recognized almost every name in the morning boxscores. Nowadays I recognize less than half. It really blows me away when a player has been in the big leagues over 5 years and I am not familiar with them... When I was young there were 24 teams. Maybe that has something to do with it.... That or maybe I am just getting slow in my old age...

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    2. It really depresses (and embarrasses) me when I hear of a guy for the first time during the Player Introductions of the All-Star game. This has happened several times in recent years.

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  3. Looks right at home when produced and placed next to Terry Forster and Brian Downing.....great stuff as always Gio!

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    1. Exactly. Place the Jake Brown card next to Mike Sadek and it looks the same way.

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  4. I am sure this has been brought up in other posts, but one great thing (of many) about the 1976 Topps set is that it is one of only two Topps sets (1973 also) that tells you on the front of the regular issue card if the pitcher is right-handed or left handed (except for Jerry Reuss and Vida Blue, as the All-Star cards don't have the little pitcher drawing). It isn't a super-big deal because the "Throws: Right"/"Throws: Left" is on the back of every card, but I always enjoyed it.

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    1. I agree...especially on the 73 set which was color coded. As a little guy I learned all of the positions by laying them out on the floor as they appear on the field. And it also helped me learn right-hand vs left-hand which I struggled with in early grade school. It was the first set I really made an effort to buy packs for.

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  5. Same here. I kinda stopped pouring over the box scores after 1994 and then after all of my favorites like George Brett and Nolan Ryan finally retired. It didn't seem to have the same appeal it once did.

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